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Playlist: Assorted Stuff

Compiled By: Jeff Conner

 Credit:
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Reel Discovery (Series)

Produced by Kristin Dreyer Kramer

Most recent piece in this series:

Reel Discovery: Toy Story 4

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Reel Discovery series | 03:00

Toystory4_small Each week on Reel Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kramer takes a quick look at the latest in movies -- from the hottest new blockbusters to little-known indies and even Blu-ray releases. Whether you prefer explosive action movies or quiet dramas, you're sure to discover something worth watching. On the latest show, Kristin sets out on another adventure with Woody, Buzz, and the rest of Bonnie's toys in Toy Story 4.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

Groks Science Radio Show (Series)

Produced by Charles Lee

Most recent piece in this series:

Generic Drugs -- Groks Science Show 2019-06-19

From Charles Lee | Part of the Groks Science Radio Show series | 19:18

Grokscience_small Generic drugs are a ubiquitous part of the pharmaceutical market, but do they deliver the same effects?  On this episode, Ms. Katherine Eban discussed problems with generic drug manufacturing.

Travelers In The Night (Series)

Produced by Al Grauer

Most recent piece in this series:

544-Missing

From Al Grauer | Part of the Travelers In The Night series | 02:00

Playing
544-Missing
From
Al Grauer

Gaia_asteroids_small PLease see the transcript.

Celtic Connections (Series)

Produced by WSIU

Most recent piece in this series:

Celtic Connections 1925

From WSIU | Part of the Celtic Connections series | 58:30

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Celtic Connections offers radio listeners a wide variety of traditional and contemporary music associated with the western European lands occupied at one time or another by people of the Celtic tribes and their descendants, including Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales, Cornwall, Brittany, and Galicia, as well as Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and other parts of North America where the Celtic influence has been felt.

 

The program's host, Bryan Kelso Crow, also brings you great music from England and from Scandinavia and other European regions, all of which have connections with a Celtic past.

 

Each week on Celtic Connections, you can count on hearing the finest selections from new releases as well as from Celtic classics. We also offer occasional concert performances, recorded exclusively for Celtic Connections, along with original interviews with some of the top names in the Celtic music world.

Blank on Blank (Series)

Produced by Blank on Blank

Most recent piece in this series:

Alvin Toffler and Margaret Mead: Future Shock, Innocence and Innovation

From Blank on Blank | Part of the Blank on Blank series | 16:07

Theexperimenterslogo_social_chalkboardgreen_small Alvin Toffler and Margaret Mead: an author and an anthropologist who endeavored to understand the impact of scientific invention. In this episode of our series, The Experimenters, we hear from two visionaries who believed that while we’ve started a technological revolution, we don’t quite know where it’s going to take us. But maybe most interesting of all – we get to hearing these archival interviews from the very future these thinkers were trying to imagine. Mead and Toffler guide us into a view of what the present might have been — or perhaps in some ways actually came to pass.

Science Update (Series)

Produced by Science Update

Most recent piece in this series:

Giraffe Spot Inheritance

From Science Update | Part of the Science Update series | 01:00

Sciupdate_sm2_small Scientists discover that giraffes inherit their spots.

Xpressions (Series)

Produced by Don Hill

Most recent piece in this series:

Ping

From Don Hill | Part of the Xpressions series | 01:44

Playing
Ping
From
Don Hill

Prx_photo_xpressions_update_small XPRESSIONS is a cheap & cheerful 'drop in' interstitial. Makes a great daily or weekend feature! Pieces are added weekly. And if you'd like the whole series --all 318 items -- just ping me!  

Authentic South (Series)

Produced by Tanner Latham

Most recent piece in this series:

Resurrecting Slave Cabins at Montpelier (7:00 version)

From Tanner Latham | Part of the Authentic South series | 07:12

Cabin6_small

This episode of Authentic South begins over 200 years ago. In the late 1700s, there was a famous French general named La Fayette. (Lafee-ette) He was a champion of the American cause during our Revolution, and he actually fought under George Washington. He became a national hero here. And after the war, he traveled around our country and was showered with praise.

 

Streets were named in his honor. Monuments that still stand in town squares were erected to him. Cities were named after him, including, interestingly, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

 

This guy was a big deal.  

 

And during one of his trips in 1825, La Fayette visited James and Dolley Madison at their home Montpelier in Virginia. And the French general wrote that one of the most interesting sights he witnessed in America was the log cabin there of a woman named Granny Millie. She was a slave who was 104 years old at the time, and she lived with her daughter and granddaughter. We know that when La Fayette met her, she showed him her only treasure, an old worn copy of the ancient book Telemachus.

 

For years, at historic plantation sites across the South, the focus was on the big house and not on the slave cabins such as Granny Millie’s. But as contributor Kelley Libby tells us, cabins like that are being resurrected on the grounds of Montpelier.

 

Kelley Libby is an associate producer for a program called With Good Reason, produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. That’s where this story first aired. For more information on the Slave Dwelling Project, visit slavedwellingproject.org.

 

As always, the Authentic South theme is by Chris Hoke and Brett Estep.

 

And to see pictures of the cabins and to hear other episodes of the show, click on over to AuthenticSouth.com. You can also find us on iTunes and Stitcher Radio and SoundCloud. We are part of the Public Radio Exchange (prx.org) and we’ve got our own page at WFAE.org.

 

Until we go South again, thanks for listening.  

CurrentCast (Series)

Produced by ChavoBart Digital Media

Most recent piece in this series:

CurrentCast programming for June 24, 2019 - July 19, 2019

From ChavoBart Digital Media | Part of the CurrentCast series | 20:00

Cc_square_logo_240_small CurrentCast is a daily, 60-second radio feature that educates the public about water issues, promotes an appreciation for aquatic environments, and encourages an educated discussion about this critical resource. This 4-week round includes the following pieces:

Air Date - Title

Mon., Jun 24 - The Rain Barrel Barrels Back: The humble rain barrel can help you conserve water while saving money.             

Tue., Jun. 25 - Checking Your Toilet for Leaks: A leaky toilet could waste hundreds of gallons of water a year.

Wed., Jun. 26 - Nitrates in Rural Wells: If well water is contaminated by fertilizer runoff, septic discharges, or animal waste, it could put babies at risk.

Thu., Jun. 27 - Greener Ground, Cleaner Water: Trading grey pipes for green spaces is helping cities control storm-water runoff.

Fri., Jun. 28 - Caring for the Roads Less Travelled: Over time, dirt roads can get pounded down and worn away, turning into gutters when it rains.

Mon., Jul. 1 - The Ins and Outs of a Septic System: Proper care and maintenance is key for maintaining private septic systems.

Tue., Jul. 2 - A Pennsylvania River Reveals its True Colors: Efforts by public and private groups have treated mine drainage and cleared up the water of the Kiski-Conemaugh rivers.

Wed., Jul. 3 - A Fish Called Cisco: “Lake herring” are making a comeback in the Great Lakes.

Thu., Jul. 4 - iTree Hydro: A new tool can help city and regional planners see the benefits of planting trees

Fri., Jul. 5 - Fish Talk: Scientists listen in on a world of underwater sound.

Mon., Jul. 8 - Stormwater Fountain: A fountain in Milwaukee provides beauty and cleaner water.

Tue., Jul. 9 - What Goes In Must Come Out: Drinking wastewater… it’s not as far-fetched as you might think.

Wed., Jul. 10 - Too Little Phosphorus: In some areas, invasive mussels are removing too much phosphorus from the water.

Thu., Jul. 11 - A Salamander Hell-bent on Clean Water: Hellbender salamander populations are declining because of poor water quality. 

Fri., Jul. 12 - Less is More…When it Comes to Runoff: Cities are using green infrastructure to meet EPA clean water standards.

Mon., Jul. 15 - Urban Rivers Floating Islands: Floating gardens in the Chicago River provide new habitat for wildlife.

Tue., Jul. 16 - Ciscoes: A Great Snack for Great Lakes Fish: Increasing the number of ciscoes in the Great Lakes helps support larger fish, too.

Wed., Jul. 17 - Trees as Stormwater Managers: The link between trees and clean water.

Thu., Jul. 18 - Bioacoustics in the Great Lakes: By recording underwater sounds in the Great Lakes, researchers can learn more about fish habits and distribution.

Fri., Jul. 19 - The Tale of the Lackawanna River: A community’s perception of their river had to be changed before they believed it was worth the effort to clean it up. 

American Routes (Series)

Produced by American Routes

Most recent piece in this series:

Footlight Parade: Sounds of the American Musical (Series)

Produced by Footlight Parade

Most recent piece in this series:

Footlight Parade: Vocal Minority (FP19:26)

From Footlight Parade | Part of the Footlight Parade: Sounds of the American Musical series | 57:43

Fp1926_small Music and lyrics by some of the best female songwriters who staked their claim in the male-dominated land of musical theater, including Dorothy Fields, Betty Comden and Carolyn Leigh -- and more recently, Lynn Ahrens and Jeanine Tesori.

BITS: THE ART OF COMMUNICATION (Series)

Produced by Halli Casser-Jayne

Most recent piece in this series:

BITS: RICHARD ARMOUR

From Halli Casser-Jayne | Part of the BITS: THE ART OF COMMUNICATION series | :55

Bitdotcom_small

What is BITS? We start with the varied definitions of bit. A bit can be a small portion, degree, or amount such as a bit of lint; a bit of luck. On the other hand a bit can be a brief amount of time, a moment as in Wait a bit. Or how about a short scene or episode in a theatrical performance? Or a bit part? Keeping with our theatrical theme, a bit can be an entertainment routine given regularly by a performer; an act. Let’s take our definition of bit further. A bit can be the sharp part of a tool, such as the cutting edge of a knife or ax or a particular kind of action, situation, or behavior as in I got tired of the macho bit. How about a matter being considered as in What's this bit about inflation? The Brits consider a bit a small coin: a three penny bit. BITS for our purposes are an amalgamation of all and is about our bit to contribute and share by bringing you a bit of knowledge as information and entertainment, and as a matter to be considered. So have a listen to our brief, daily dose of BITS where a little knowledge goes a long way brought to you by the artist of communication Halli Casser-Jayne, host of The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds. For more information visit bit.ly/YEswYS.

The Audubon Moment (Series)

Produced by John Nelson

Most recent piece in this series:

The Crested Caracara

From John Nelson | Part of the The Audubon Moment series | 01:00

Roseate_spoonbill_flight_small

The Audubon Moment is a series dedicated to helping listeners in your radio market identify the birds that can be found in their own back yard or local environment. Over 100 segments have been produced for this series with is funded through a grant from Toyota Together Green by Audubon.

With over 47 million American's identifying themselves as birders, this series could be a valuable tool in bringing in new members to your public radio listening audience.

Vinyl Cafe (Series)

Produced by Vinyl Cafe

Most recent piece in this series:

The Vinyl Cafe February 14th, 2016, "Break Up Songs"

From Vinyl Cafe | Part of the Vinyl Cafe series | 54:01

Stuart-smiling_small It’s break-up music on the show today.

Gems of Bluegrass (Series)

Produced by Philip Nusbaum

Most recent piece in this series:

Another Look at Evolving With Body and Soul

From Philip Nusbaum | Part of the Gems of Bluegrass series | 06:44

Phil_w_zeitfunk_small Bluegrass music is in a constant state of evolution. Bluegrass artists are drawn to the catalog of songs by the Father of Bluegrass music, Bill Monroe. One of the popular songs from the Monroe canon, is With Body and Soul.

PRX Remix Select (Series)

Produced by PRX Remix

Most recent piece in this series:

Remix Select: Episode 424, 6/19/2019

From PRX Remix | Part of the PRX Remix Select series | 58:59

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  • This Is PRX Remix Wash Out
    Broke For Free
    00:00:18
  • Indian Summer
    Sandip Roy
    00:06:00
  • PRX Podcast Garage
    PRX Remix
    00:00:26
  • What's In a Name
    Deana Heitzman
    00:11:36
  • Tape For You
    PRX Remix
    00:00:34
  • Every Morning I Hear This Voice
    Mikkel Nedergaard
    00:03:43
  • Little Menace
    L'il M
    00:00:30
  • PRX Remix Be Good to Them
    The Books and Roman Mars
    00:00:22
  • Grunting
    The World According To Sound
    00:01:26
  • We Love That You're Here
    Ray Pang & Steve Combs
    00:00:25
  • Basque Sheepherder's Ball
    The Kitchen Sisters Present
    00:21:13
  • Gordon Hempton on Remix
    Zak Rosen
    00:00:59
  • Annie Philbin
    KCRW's Guest DJ Project
    00:11:08
  • Tippy Toe
    Lullatone
    00:00:42

Says You! Full Hour Show (Series)

Produced by Says You!

Most recent piece in this series:

SY-2121R2: Says You! 2121R2 from Vermont, 6/28/2019

From Says You! | Part of the Says You! Full Hour Show series | 50:58

Says-you-2013_medium_small Says You! 2121R2 from Vermont with Gregg Portet

Shelf Discovery (Series)

Produced by Kristin Dreyer Kramer

Most recent piece in this series:

Shelf Discovery: The Rumor by Lesley Kara

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Shelf Discovery series | 03:00

Therumor_small Each week on Shelf Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kamer offers listeners a brief look inside the pages of a new book. From mysteries to memoirs, classics to chick lit, busy readers are sure to find plenty of picks to add to their shelves. On this week's show, Kristin sees what kind of damage a little bit of gossip can do in Lesley Kara’s The Rumor.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow (Series)

Produced by Phil Mariage

Most recent piece in this series:

Antisemitism - A Generational Discussion

From Phil Mariage | Part of the Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow series | 51:56

Ytt-300x300_small

85 year old Phil Kaplan along with middle generaton Rabbi Barry Block and college student Hanna Liebermann take on antisemitism in a way that stands up to the menace to our society. Not only can we apply their thoughts to the religious aspect, we can see the connection to other us and them issues such as immigration and racial tensions.
This is perhaps one of very few discussions that compare generational thought. In our current times of strife, their thoughts pull no punches in the dangers associated with antisemtic actions and philosophy. Your audience will be moved by their comments and courage.

Fugitive Waves (Series)

Produced by The Kitchen Sisters

Most recent piece in this series:

WILLIAM FERRIS – KEEPER OF SOUTHERN FOLKLIFE

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 32:00

Ks_fugitivewavessm_small Folklorist and Professor Bill Ferris, a Grammy nominee this year for his "Voices of Mississippi" 3 CD Box set, has committed his life to documenting and expanding the study of the American South. His recordings, photos and films of preachers, quilt makers, blues musicians and more are now online as part of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina. Bill Ferris grew up on a farm in Warren County, Mississippi along the Black River. His family, the only white family on the farm, worked side by side with the African Americans in the fields. When he was five, a woman named Mary Gordon would take him every first Sunday to Rose Hill Church, the small African American church on the farm. When Bill was a teenager he got a reel-to-reel tape recorder and started recording the hymns and services. “ I realized that the beautiful hymns were sung from memory—there were no hymnals in the church—and that when those families were no longer there, the hymns would simply disappear.” These recordings led Bill to a lifetime of documenting the world around him—preachers, workers, storytellers, men in prison, quilt makers, the blues musicians living near his home (including the soon-to-be well known Mississippi Fred McDowell). Bill became a prolific author, folklorist, filmmaker, professor, and served as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is a professor of history at UNC–Chapel Hill and an adjunct professor in the Curriculum in Folklore. He served as the founding director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi, where he was a faculty member for 18 years. He is associate director of the Center for the Study of the American South. Bill’s has written and edited 10 books and created 15 documentary films, most dealing with African-American music and other folklore representing the Mississippi Delta. His thousands of photographs, films, audio interviews, and recordings of musicians are now online in the William R. Ferris Collection, part of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina. This story was produced by Barrett Golding with The Kitchen Sisters for The Keepers series.

99% Invisible (Standard Length) (Series)

Produced by Roman Mars

Most recent piece in this series:

99% Invisible #170- Children of the Magenta (Standard 4:30 version)

From Roman Mars | Part of the 99% Invisible (Standard Length) series | 04:30

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On the evening of May 31, 2009, 216 passengers, three pilots, and nine flight attendants boarded an Airbus 330 in Rio de Janeiro. This flight, Air France 447, was headed across the Atlantic to Paris. The take-off was unremarkable. The plane reached a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet. The passengers read and watched movies and slept. Everything proceeded normally for several hours. Then, with no communication to the ground or air traffic control, flight 447 suddenly disappeared.

 

Days later, several bodies and some pieces of the plane were found floating in the Atlantic Ocean. But it would be two more years before most of the wreckage was recovered from the ocean’s depths. All 228 people on board had died. The cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorders, however, were intact, and these recordings told a story about how Flight 447 ended up in the bottom of the Atlantic.

The story they told was was about what happened when the automated system flying the plane suddenly shut off, and the pilots were left surprised, confused, and ultimately unable to fly their own plane.

earlyautopilot2[Early Autopilot. Credit: Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution]

The first so called “auto-pilot” was invented by the Sperry Corporation in 1912. It allowed the plane to fly straight and level without the pilot’s intervention. In the 1950s the autopilots improved, and could be programed to follow a route.

By the 1970s, even complex electrical systems and hydraulic systems were automated, and studies were showing that most accidents were caused not by mechanical error, but by human error. These findings prompted the French company Airbus to develop safer planes that used even more advanced automation.

Airbus set out to design what they hoped would be the safest plane yet—a plane that even the worst pilots could fly with ease. Bernard Ziegler, senior vice president for engineering at Airbus, famously said that he was building an airplane that even his concierge would be able to fly.

Airbus_A300_B2_Zero-G[One of the first Airbus planes for commercial use. Credit: Stahlkocher.]

Not only did Ziegler’s plane have auto-pilot, it also had what’s called a “fly-by-wire” system. Whereas autopilot just does what a pilot tells it to do, fly-by-wire is a computer-based control system that can interpret what the pilot wants to do, and then execute the command smoothly and safely. For example, if the pilot pulls back on his or her control stick, the fly-by-wire system will understand that the pilot wants to pitch the plane up, and then will do it at the just the right angle and rate.

Importantly, the fly-by-wire system will also protect the plane from getting into an “aerodynamic stall.” In a plane, stalling can happen when the nose of the plane is pitched up at too steep an angle. This can cause the plane to lose “lift” and start to descend.

stall[From top: a plane in normal flight; a plane in a stall. Credit: Wikipedia Commons.]

Stalling in a plane can be dangerous, but fly-by-wire automation makes it impossible to do. As long as it’s on.

Unlike autopilot, the “fly-by-wire” system cannot be turned on and off by the pilot. However, it can turn itself off. And that’s exactly what it did on May 31, 2009, as Air France Flight 447 made its transatlantic flight.

planned route[The dotted line begins where Flight 447’s last contact with the control tower was made. Credit: Mysid]

When a pressure probe on the outside of the plane iced over, the automation could no longer tell how fast the plane was going, and the autopilot disengaged. The “fly-by-wire” system also switched into a mode in which it was no longer offering protections against aerodynamic stall. When the autopilot disengaged, the co-pilot in the right seat put his hand on the control stick—a little joy stick like thing to his right—and pulled it back, pitching the nose of the plane up.

This action caused the plane to go into a stall, and yet, even as the stall warning sounded, none of the pilots could figure out what was happening to them. If they’d realized they were in a stall, the fix would have been clear. “The recovery would have required them to put the nose down, get it below the horizon, regain a flying speed and then pull out of the ensuing dive,” says William Langewiesche, a journalist and former pilot who wrote about the crash of Flight 447 for Vanity Fair. 

The pilots, however, never tried to recover, because they never seemed to realize they were in a stall.  Four minutes and twenty seconds after the incident began, the plane pancaked into the Atlantic, instantly killing all 228 people on board.

 

There are various factors that contributed to the crash of flight 447. Some people point to the fact that the airbus control sticks do not move in unison, so the pilot in the left seat would not have felt the pilot in the right seat pull back on his stick, the maneuver that ultimately pitched the plane into a dangerous angle. But even if you concede this potential design flaw, it still begs the question, how could the pilots have a computer yelling ‘stall’ at them, and not realize they were in a stall?

It’s clear that automation played a role in this accident, though there is some disagreement about what kind of role it played. Maybe it was a badly designed system that confused the pilots, or maybe years of depending on automation had left the pilots unprepared to take over the controls.

“For however much automation has helped the airline passenger by increasing safety it has had some negative consequences,” says Langewiesche. “In this case it’s quite clear that these pilots had had experience stripped away from them for years.” The Captain of the Air France flight had logged 346 hours of flying over the past six months. But within those six months, there were only about four hours in which he was actually in control of an airplane—just the take-offs and landings. The rest of the time, auto-pilot was flying the plane. Langewiesche believes this lack experience left the pilots unprepared to do their jobs.

Voo_Air_France_447-2006-06-14[Pieces of the wreckage of Flight 447. Credit: Roberto Maltchik]

Complex and confusing automated systems may also have contributed to the crash. When one of the co-pilots hauled back on his stick, he pitched the plane into an angle that eventually caused the stall. But it’s possible that he didn’t understand that he was now flying in a different mode, one which would not regulate and smooth out his movements. This confusion about what how the fly-by-wire system responds in different modes is referred to, aptly, as “mode confusion,”  and it has come up in other accidents.

“A lot of what’s happening is hidden from view from the pilots,” says Langewiesche. “It’s buried. When the airplane starts doing something that is unexpected and the pilot says ‘hey, what’s it doing now?’ — that’s a very very standard comment in cockpits today.'”

Langewiesche isn’t the only person to point out that ‘What’s it doing now?’ is a commonly heard question in the cockpit.

In 1997,  American Airlines captain Warren Van Der Burgh said that the industry has turned pilots into “Children of the Magenta” who are too dependent on the guiding magenta-colored lines on their screens.

William Langewiesche agrees:

“We appear to be locked into a cycle in which automation begets the erosion of skills or the lack of skills in the first place and this then begets more automation.”

However potentially dangerous it may be to rely too heavily on automation, no one is advocating getting rid of it entirely. It’s agreed upon across the board that automation has made airline travel safer. The accident rate for air travel is very low: about 2.8 accidents for every one million departures. (Airbus planes, by the way, are no more or less safe than their main rival, Boeing.)

Langewiesche thinks that we are ultimately heading toward pilotless planes. And by the time that happens, the automation will be so good and so reliable that humans, with all of their fallibility, will really just be in the way.

Screen Shot 2015-06-22 at 11.54.13 AM[The magenta guiding lines of automation, from a 1997 presentation by pilot Warren Van Der Burgh.]

Producer Katie Mingle spoke with William Langewiesche, a former pilot who wrote an article in Vanity Fair about this flight, as well as Nadine Sarter, a systems engineer at the University of Michigan. This episode also features the voice of Captain Warren Van Der Burgh.

Paul Messing's Audio Producer's Grab Bag (Series)

Produced by Paul Messing

Most recent piece in this series:

Orchestral Fanfare :30

From Paul Messing | Part of the Paul Messing's Audio Producer's Grab Bag series | :32

Orchestra_prx_240_small A classic fanfare, orchestral in nature. Thirty seconds, and a great interstitial element between spoken word pieces.

The Sundilla Radio Hour (Series)

Produced by Sundilla

Most recent piece in this series:

The Sundilla Radio Hour #322

From Sundilla | Part of the The Sundilla Radio Hour series | 59:00

Dsc_0704-150x150_medium_small The Sundilla Radio Hour for the week of 06/17/2019.

Rockin' in the Days of Confusion (Series)

Produced by Stephen R Webb

Most recent piece in this series:

DC 1926

From Stephen R Webb | Part of the Rockin' in the Days of Confusion series | 59:00

Playing
DC 1926
From
Stephen R Webb

Novella-us_small This week we manage to squeeze in 14 tracks, half of which have never been played on Rockin' in the Days of Confusion before. See http://thehermitrambles.blogspot.com/ for complete playlist.

A Moment of Science (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

AMOS 19.134: Human Beings: Superpredators?, 7/5/2019

From WFIU | Part of the A Moment of Science series | 02:00

Mos-fullcolor-rgb-stacked_small Human Beings: Superpredators?

Ken Rudin's Political Junkie (Series)

Produced by Ken Rudin's Political Junkie

Most recent piece in this series:

282: Political Junkie Full-Hour Show #282, 6/21/2019

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Ken Rudin's Political Junkie series | 53:58

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The Democrats are days away from participating in their first presidential debate of the 2020 cycle.  Dave Weigel of the Washington Post offers a look at what to -- and what not to -- expect.

 
West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin is giving hints that he is unhappy with life in the Senate and may want to come home next year to run for governor, a job he previously held.  This would be bad news for Democrats who are desperate to keep him in Washington in their (longshot) bid to win a majority in the Senate in 2020.  Hoppy Kercheval of Metro News in the Mountain State talks about Manchin's independence from his party's dogma, which pleases Democrats because he keeps winning re-election but drives them crazy at the same time when he sides with President Trump on issues like the border wall and Supreme Court nominees such as Brett Kavanaugh.

 
As Sarah Huckabee Sanders is leaving her job as White House press secretary, Trump suggests that the next logical career for her would be to follow in her father's footsteps and run for governor of Arkansas.  Janine Parry of the University of Arkansas speculates as to how Sanders might fare in such a campaign.

 
And Ron Klain, the former chief of staff to Al Gore, takes us back 20 years to the moment when Gore announced his presidential candidacy in Carthage, Tenn.  Gore won the popular vote but lost in the Electoral College -- sound familiar? -- and Klain wonders how the world might have been different if the Supreme Court chose Gore, not George W. Bush, in that famous 2000 decision.

Imaginary Worlds (Series)

Produced by Eric Molinsky

Most recent piece in this series:

Nerdlesque

From Eric Molinsky | Part of the Imaginary Worlds series | 24:40

Playing
Nerdlesque
From
Eric Molinsky

The_empire_strips_back_enmore_theatre_josh_groom_36_-_lighter_small Burlesque has merged with geek culture to form nerdlesque – where characters from Star Trek, Star Wars, Doctor Who and other fantasy franchises strip down to pasties and g-strings. Nerdlesque is also a form of storytelling, similar to fanfiction or cosplay in the way it encompass a diverse range of fans, and re-imagines the power dynamics of the original stories. We talk with pioneering nerdlesque performers Fem Appeal and Nasty Canasta, and we get a back stage tour of The Empire Strips Back with Russall Beattie, Lisa Toyer and Kael Murray. Needless to say, this episode contains adult content with adult language.