%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Replacements

Compiled By: Maureen Haeger

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

75: Worm Charming

From Trace Kerr | Part of the Brain Junk series | 05:58

This episode will have you outside with a sharpened stake, a hammer, a slab of metal and an empty coffee can. That's right, we're going to be talking about charming worms right out of the ground and explaining the science behind how it works. 'Cause it DOES work and you're going to want to try.

Brain_junk_words_orange_lightbulb_logo_small This episode will have you outside with a sharpened stake, a hammer, a slab of metal and an empty coffee can. That's right, we're going to be talking about charming worms right out of the ground and explaining the science behind how it works. 'Cause it DOES work and you're going to want to try.

I'm Covered

From Out of the Blocks | Part of the Out of the Blocks, Quick Hits series | 04:18

I'm about 90 percent covered, so it's not really, 'What you see is what you get'

_dsc9345_small In this Out of the Blocks excerpt, we head to Southeast Baltimore's Highlandtown neighborhood for a visit to Tom Chetelat's Studio 7 Gallery, where the souvenirs are permanent.

October 2019 - Oversexualizing gay identity

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 04:06

October 1, 2019 - OutCasters Andrew and Amalee consider why some people think that showing anything to do with gay people is inappropriate for children to see.

Oc-westchester-andrew4519-amalee240_small

In May 2019, the PBS animated children's series "Arthur" released an episode in which a gay couple gets married.  It was broadcast all over the country — except in Alabama, where Alabama Public Television refused to broadcast it.  This prompted OutCasters Andrew and Amalee to consider why some people think it's fine for kids to see an age-appropriate depiction of an opposite-sex wedding but not a same-sex one.  Andrew reads.

Shelf Discovery: The Furies by Katie Lowe

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Shelf Discovery series | 03:00

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin makes friends with a group of fiercely loyal outsiders in author Katie Lowe’s The Furies.

Thefuries_small Each week on Shelf Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kamer offers listeners a brief look inside the pages of a new book. From mysteries to memoirs, classics to chick lit, busy readers are sure to find plenty of picks to add to their shelves. On this week's show, Kristin makes friends with a group of fiercely loyal outsiders in author Katie Lowe’s The Furies.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

How Cultural Training Helps Doctors Treat Refugees

From Side Effects Public Media | 03:25

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

Paarlbergphoto_small

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

On a block on Indianapolis’ southside, there are three international grocery stores -- Saraga international grocery, Tienda Morelos and Chinland Asian Grocery. 

This area once was almost all-white and hostile to minorities, according to a newspaper clipping from 1965. Now, a community of Burmese refugees, along with a growing subset of Congolese and Syrian refugees, call this southside suburb home. 

 

And down the road is the Franciscan Health Family Medicine Center.

"So we have our underserved southside population, and then we also have a significant amount of immigrants and refugees," says Adam Paarlberg, a family medicine doctor at Franciscan Health. 

Paarlberg also trains medical residents who help staff this clinic.

On a late summer day, around two dozen of these residents are watching a demonstration of a translation system call Martti. It looks like an iPad on a rolling stand, and connects doctors with live interpreters for over 250 languages. 

At the front of the room, Paarlberg and a medical assistant are staging an exam as part of the training session. The Martti interpreter translates his words into Hakha Chin, a regional dialect in Myanmar. 

"If she’s having any headaches, dyspnea, right upper quandrent pain, edema ... Probably needs to come to the triage, but we’ll see her next week." 

The residents laugh because Paarlberg intentionally demonstrated some of the don’ts of working with an interpreter. He asked long, rambling questions and used confusing medical jargon.

""As you can imagine telling the patient to 'break a leg,' or you know, 'this is going to cost you an arm and a leg' there might not be an equivalent there," Paarlberg tells the residents. 

Second-year resident Michael Padilla says the demonstration made him more aware of the complexity of translations. 

"Like one of the things that we learned today that was really cool was is there’s no word for anxiety," Padilla says. "And how some things get translated like 'how you got here’ was turned into ‘how did you make this appointment.'" 

But this training is about cultural considerations too. Like knowing how to address mental illness -- a condition seen as taboo in some cultures.

Paarlberg says patients may complain of physical symptoms instead. "They may come in with a headache or abdominal pain, or dizziness, or something like that."  

This means mental illness can go undiagnosed unless a doctor understands cultural clues. Paarlberg says training residents to be aware of these considerations is more than just being polite. 

"If a patient doesn't feel like that you're being mindful or understanding or culturally sensitive, meaning you've already lost that person," he says. "That person's not going to follow your instructions, they're not going to be compliant with the medical care and follow up."

David Acosta, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer with the Association of American Medical Colleges, says more medical schools are offering this type of training. 

"This new generation has a large interest in getting these experiences, and so medical schools basically are really pushing hard to try to provide those experiences to them," Acosta says. 

Of the medical schools the association surveys, more than 60 percent now offer training on cultural competency. This is up from just 30 percent several years ago. 

Paarlberg says preparing future doctors to work with people from different cultures isn’t just for big cities anymore. Even rural hospitals need it. 

 

This story was produced by Side Effects Public Media, a news collaborative covering public health.

Childbirth, Babies & Bonuses

From Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University | 03:02

New research on how providing incentives for doctors in the developing world might help more women survive childbirth.

Doctor_and_baby_240_small

In America, doctors are often criticized for doing too much, like running extra tests or scheduling too many follow-up appointments. But in many parts of the developing world, doctors are stretched thin and cutting corners.

More than 800 women die in childbirth every day in the developing world – often because doctors know what to do, they just don’t do it. (There’s even a name for this: the know-do gap.)

Now, a team of U.S. researchers thinks it has found a way to motivate doctors in the developing world to keep their patients healthier—and it could hold a bigger message about how societies deliver healthcare.

Manoj Mohanan from Duke University, with collaborators from Harvard, Stanford and University College London, decided to see if certain types of incentives could improve doctors’ performance, especially when it comes to preventing women from hemorrhaging and dying in childbirth.

Stakeholders of Nature

From World Ocean Observatory | Part of the World Ocean Radio: The Sea Connects All Things series | 05:27

How do we describe the relationship between human society and nature? This week on World Ocean Radio we discuss what it means to be a stakeholder, and how the word itself has evolved from one of business, ownership and investment to that the larger context of environmentalism and ecological connection. We argue that we must understand the interactions between humanity and natural systems, using collaboration, partnership and integration if we are to invent a new way forward toward a sustainable future.

525_stakeholders-of-nature_small

How do we describe the relationship between human society and nature? This week on World Ocean Radio we discuss what it means to be a stakeholder, and how the word itself has evolved from one of business, ownership and investment to that the larger context of environmentalism and ecological connection. We argue that we must understand the interactions between humanity and natural systems, using collaboration, partnership and integration if we are to invent a new way forward toward a sustainable future.

Do you prefer the written word? Head on over to Medium.com/@TheW2O.

About World Ocean Radio
World Ocean Radio is a weekly series of five-minute audio essays available for syndicated use at no cost by college and community radio stations worldwide. Peter Neill, Director of the World Ocean Observatory and host of World Ocean Radio, provides coverage of a broad spectrum of ocean issues from science and education to advocacy and exemplary projects.

Image Credit
Ko Phi Phi, Thailand courtesy of Reiseuhu

The Aerial Tales of Bone Mother

From KFAI | Part of the 10,000 Fresh Voices series | 05:18

The Slavic folklore of Baba Yaga flies high in Bone Mother, a world premiere by Sandbox Theatre’s aerial wing - The Swingset. Co-directed by Evelyn Digiloramo and Danielle Siver, the work weaves together myth, ritual and rites of passage with aerial silks, theater and live music. Bone Mother is performed in the grandiose architecture of The Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis. Story by Dixie Treichel for KFAI's Minneculture.

Bone-mother-photo_by_matthew_glover_small The Slavic folklore of Baba Yaga flies high in Bone Mother, a world premiere by Sandbox Theatre’s aerial wing - The Swingset. Co-directed by Evelyn Digiloramo and Danielle Siver, the work weaves together myth, ritual and rites of passage with aerial silks, theater and live music. Bone Mother is performed in the grandiose architecture of The Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis. Story by Dixie Treichel for KFAI's Minneculture.