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Playlist: Apollo 11 Turns 50

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: NASA
Image by: NASA 
Curated Playlist

July 16th is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. It launched on July 16, 1969, and astronauts landed on the moon on July 20th.

Destination Moon

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 58:59

On July 20th, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the moon. They had reached the distant light that humans had admired and looked up to for thousands of years. It was a mission with hundreds of dedicated minds behind it. A dangerous and ambitious mission, that could have failed at many moments.
On this special episode of The Pulse, we will explore the science that got us to the moon, the politics that push space exploration, and our relationship with the moon. Also - how people around the country remember and celebrated the moon landing.

Playing
Destination Moon
From
WHYY

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small PROGRAM DETAILS 

A fragile daisy chain of events

During a recent panel discussion, Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins called their mission a “fragile daisy chain of events” that could have gone wrong at any moment. And it almost did, several times. We look more closely into one especially difficult aspect of getting to the moon: the landing. Space journalist Andrew Chaikin describes the challenges and errors that almost ended the mission.

The science of the Apollo program
Eric Ward from the Linda Hall Library talks about the moon rock they currently have on display, and why this aspect of the Apollo missions was so important to our understanding of the moon’s origins. Astronomer Jackie Faherty from the Museum of Natural History weighs in on the moon being the perfect place to learn more about the universe.

Kids and space exploration
What can legos teach kids about the challenges of space exploration? We visit with kids in Houston, Texas, and find out how they view the moon landing - and the technology available at the time.

The politics of space exploration
Science and technology got us to the moon, but the spark that got things going was politics. Politics and space exploration have had a long and complicated history. Priorities change, funding dries up. We explore how NASA adapts to changing administrations, and changing expectations.

The future of space exploration
Former rocket scientist Poppy Northcutt was in the control room during Apollo missions, and says it’s “bittersweet” to look back on those days. She’s proud of all that was achieved, but sad that we didn’t keep pushing on. She makes a case for returning to the moon - and going on to Mars.

Washington Goes To The Moon PART 1

From Richard Paul | Part of the Washington Goes To The Moon series | 58:56

This program, Part 1: "Washington We Have A Problem" looks at the battle to keep the Apollo space program funded and on deadline.

Part_1_image_small This is Part 1 of two hour-long documentaries called "Washington Goes To The Moon" which examine the behind the scenes, public policy stories leading up to Apollo 11's flight to the moon. Each hour is self-contained and newscast compatible. The stories told in these programs (about NASA management, White House budget politics and Congressional oversight) had as much to do with Apollo 11 reaching the moon as the Saturn 5 rocket, but they have never been told. This program, Part 1: "Washington We Have A Problem" looks at the battle to keep the Apollo space program funded and on deadline. It tells, among other stories: -Within weeks after pledging to send a man to the moon, President Kennedy got cold feet and tried to get out the commitment by bringing the Soviets on-board. -Lyndon Johnson's budget director tried to scrap the goal of getting to the moon by 1969 in order to help Pres. Johnson pay for the Vietnam War.

Folktale of Lunar Fancy

From Northeast Indiana Public Radio | Part of the Folktales series | 59:59

All eyes and ears are pointed to that heavenly nightsky, this edition of Folktales, so grab a moonbeam, and join us on this musical flight of Lunar Fancy.

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According to American poet, Carl Sandburg, “The moon is a friend for the lonesome to talk to.” That’s a lovely thought, and this edition of Folktales, our guests of honor are Mr. Moonlight and Mama Luna themselves, as we look heavenward and get ready to explore their special secrets of celestial harmony and inspiration.
With plenty of wise words, and musical moonglow, we'll be traveling through the Americas, across Europe, and into Africa & far Eastern folkworlds, and our featured musicians include Al Petteway, Fred Rothert, Socks in the Frying Pan, Inkuyo, Keola Beamer & George Winston, Ali Farka Touré & Toumani Diabaté, J. Donald Walters and more. It's a world of wonderment we're deepsky observing, with this Folktale of Lunar Fancy.

One Giant Leap

From WHRV | Part of the How We Saw It series | 54:03

This 1-hour radio documentary celebrates the moon landing through the eyes of those who witnessed it and the memories of those who contributed to its success in ways large and small.

Playing
One Giant Leap
From
WHRV

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Participants include:

 Gene Kranz, Apollo Flight Director at NASA, famously portrayed by Ed Harris in the film Apollo 13

Sergei Khrushchev, son of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, a former engineer in the Soviet space program who is now an American citizen and a professor at Brown University

Tom Hanks, producer of the HBO Miniseries From the Earth to the Moon

John Hirasaki, Apollo 11 Landing and Recovery

Gene Edmunds, NASA photographer

John Young, Commander of Apollo 16

Jim Head, Apollo geologist

John Casani, Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena since 1956

Dr. Firouz Naderi, Associate Director, Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena

7 listeners who recall the impact the event had on their lives

 

Picturing Apollo 11- John Bisney & JL Pickering Create A Photographers Dream Book

From North State Public Radio | Part of the Blue Dot series | 59:00

Dave talks to John Bisney and JL Pickering as we ramp up our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the Moon Landing this summer. Bisney and Pickering have produced a beautiful coffee table type photography book called Picturing Apollo 11.

The volume features many never before published photographs that chronicle the historic mission from the training of the astronauts and assembly of the rocket and spacecraft in the mighty Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center to liftoff, the Moon, splashdown and the aftermath of the mission.

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Dave talks to John Bisney and JL Pickering as we ramp up our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the Moon Landing this summer. Bisney and Pickering have produced a beautiful coffee table type photography book called Picturing Apollo 11.

The volume features many never before published photographs that chronicle the historic mission from the training of the astronauts and assembly of the rocket and spacecraft in the mighty Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center to liftoff, the Moon, splashdown and the aftermath of the mission.

Both Bisney and Pickering are space history buffs and they have a lively conversation sharing their passion for the golden age of space exploration with our host.

The Eagle Has Landed: Remembering Neil Armstrong

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

We celebrate the 47th anniversary of the first moon landing with the reprise of a conversation with author and NBC space reporter Jay Barbree about his trusted friend Neil Armstrong. Jason Davis brings us a special report on NASA’s 2020 Mars rover. Emily Lakdawalla reminds us that New Horizons at Pluto was anything but the end of exploration in our solar system. Bruce Betts poses a fascinating question in this week’s What’s Up trivia contest.

Neil_armstrong_nasa_portrait_small_small We celebrate the 47th anniversary of the first moon landing with the reprise of a conversation with author and NBC space reporter Jay Barbree about his trusted friend Neil Armstrong.  Jason Davis brings us a special report on NASA’s 2020 Mars rover.  Emily Lakdawalla reminds us that New Horizons at Pluto was anything but the end of exploration in our solar system.  Bruce Betts poses a fascinating question in this week’s What’s Up trivia contest. 

Moon Graffiti

From The Truth | 15:21

What if Apollo 11 had crashed?

Playing
Moon Graffiti
From
The Truth

Moongrafitti_prx_image_small “That’s one small step for a man; one giant leap for mankind.” We all know the quote, the triumphant story. It seems written in stone. But Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong came within inches of tragedy when they landed Apollo 11. Moon Grafitti imagines what it might have sounded like if things had gone a little differently. Based on a contingency speech written by William Safire for Richard Nixon titled “In the Event of Moon Disaster.”

We're still experimenting with how to best format our series. If you would like to air this piece without our host intro, credits, or sonic ID, we are more than happy to make a different version that would better suit your needs (and we'll do it quickly!). Please let us know what you think, we are always looking for ways to make our show better.

 

Lunar Mysteries

From Hold That Thought | Part of the Out There: The Science of Exploring the Universe series | 13:12

Dr. Bradley Jolliff describes how lunar samples and orbiters provide insights into the history of Earth's closest neighbor.

36714548_41a01a083a_o_small What questions have yet to be answered about the Moon? Bradley Jolliff , professor of earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how lunar samples and orbiters continue to provide insights into the geologic history of Earth's closest neighbor. Jolliff, who works with the Mars rover Opportunity, also shares his dreams of a future lunar rover that would visit sites that continue to puzzle scientists, including the immense South Pole-Aitken Basin and the icy, permanently shadowed lands near the Moon's poles.

A Shortcut Back To 1969 -"The Lunar Module"

From Peter Bochan | 12:13

This segment of "A Shortcut Back to 1969" -The Lunar Module, is a mix of the sounds, voices and music of the summer of 1969 featuring original NASA recordings of the launch of Apollo 11, Richard M. Nixon, Neal Armstrong, John F. Kennedy, The 5th Dimension, David Bowie,The Who, The Beach Boys, Burgess Meredith, General Westmoreland, various soldiers and reporters in Vietnam, astronauts, mission control specialists and much more...

275px-aldrin_apollo_11_small This segment of "A Shortcut Back to 1969" -The Lunar Module,  is a mix of the sounds, voices and music of the summer of 1969 featuring original NASA recordings of the launch of Apollo 11, Richard M. Nixon, Neil Armstrong, John F. Kennedy, The 5th Dimension, David Bowie,The Who, The Beach Boys, Burgess Meredith, General Westmoreland, various soldiers and reporters in Vietnam, astronauts, mission control specialists and much more...

Part of a 45th Anniversary look back at 1969

Craning

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 08:08

"Craning" is about the space program.

Playing
Craning
From
Nate DiMeo

74_craning_small "Craning" is about the space program.

Family Snapshot

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 07:36

"Family Snapshot" is about Charles Duke.

Family-snapshot_small "Family Snapshot" is about Charles Duke.