%s1 / %s2

Playlist: H2O Radio's Portfolio

 Credit:

H2O Radio is award-winning journalism in the public interest. We conduct in-depth reporting on water issues both local and global to inform audiences and generate conversations.

Featured

Little Ditch. Big Deal. A Couple Living off the Grid Challenged Colorado Water Law—and Won

From H2O Radio | Part of the The Confluence series | 06:18

Living off the grid in Colorado's vast San Luis Valley, Chuck and Barbara Tidd needed to find a source of energy to supplement their solar panels. Their solution, to use a creek on their property to generate power, led to a legal battle that went all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court—where they won. That decision worries some who say their new right could upend water law that goes back 150 years.

H2o_logo_240_small Living off the grid in Colorado's vast San Luis Valley, Chuck and Barbara Tidd needed to find a source of energy to supplement their solar panels. Their solution, to use a creek on their property to generate power, led to a legal battle that went all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court—where they won. That decision worries some who say their new right could upend water law that goes back 150 years.

Vanishing Act: NASA Scientist Jay Famiglietti on Our Changing Water Future

From H2O Radio | Part of the Sounds From a Warming Planet series | 27:41

NASA research looks at the West and the world’s dwindling water resources—and what they're finding is concerning.

H2oradio_logo_300_small Sitting in a place they call the "mall" in the center of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory campus in Pasadena, California, it's shady and relaxing. Scientists confab at tables with umbrellas, sipping coffee, laptops open to graphs and charts. That's where H2O Radio's Frani Halperin met Jay Famiglietti, senior water scientist, to talk about NASA's latest missions. The space agency isn't just sending rockets to explore our galaxy—they're launching satellites to look back at Earth. Missions with names like "GRACE" are "amazing"—not just for their bird's-eye view of our home planet but for what that perspective is telling us about our challenging water future. 

Known Unknowns: The Toxic Chemicals Swirling Through Your Veins and Why It Didn’t Have to Be That Way

From H2O Radio | Part of the This Week in Water series | 07:08

There was a time, back in the 1970s, when the United States was at the cutting edge of protecting human health and the environment. We passed something called the "Toxic Substances Control Act," also known as "TSCA," which was intended to regulate chemicals for safety. But TSCA failed to live up to its promise. Of the over 84,000 chemicals in commercial use today, only nine are banned or regulated. The rest? They're in household products, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and toys—many without adequate study about their health effects.

H2o_logo_240_small There was a time, back in the 1970s, when the United States was at the cutting edge of protecting human health and the environment. We passed the "Clean Water Act," the "Clean Air Act," and something called the "Toxic Substances Control Act," also known as "TSCA," which was intended to regulate chemicals for safety.

But TSCA failed to live up to its promise. Of the over 84,000 chemicals in commercial use today, only nine are banned or regulated. The rest? They're in household products, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and toys—many without adequate study about their health effects.

What happened, and what can we do to protect ourselves from the toxins that surround us? H2O Radio investigates.

Colorado Water Providers React to New EPA Health Advisory

From H2O Radio | Part of the Journalism About Water series | 05:40

The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new stricter guidelines for two perfluorinated chemicals: PFOA and PFOS. The compounds have been linked to adverse health effects, including cancer.

In Colorado, three water districts were found to have the chemicals in their systems. Does their location near a military base offer any clues as to the source?

H2o_logo_240_small The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new stricter guidelines for two perfluorinated chemicals: PFOA and PFOS. The compounds have been linked to adverse health effects, including cancer. In Colorado, three water districts were found to have the chemicals in their systems. Does their location near a military base offer any clues as to the source?

Forgotten. Did the State of Colorado Leave Residents with Bad Water? (Part Two)

From H2O Radio | 08:43

Gas drilling came to southern Colorado's Raton Basin in the late 1990s, and along with it heavy traffic, noise—and what many locals believe—contaminated water. Did the state do enough to help?

This is part two of a two-part investigative piece by H2O Radio.

H2o_logo_240_small In part one of H2O Radio's story about water contamination in southern Colorado's Raton Basin we heard from a homeowner who had much frustration after gas drilling came to her rural area, both with the industry and the state agency in charge of regulating oil and gas activities—the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, or "COGCC." The COGCC wrote a report saying the contamination in wells was naturally occurring, even though many residents had baseline testing showing it wasn't there before drilling started. So was the report good science? H2O Radio put it to some experts. 

Forgotten. Did the State of Colorado Leave Residents with Bad Water? (Part One)

From H2O Radio | 09:27

Gas drilling came to southern Colorado's Raton Basin in the late 1990s, and along with it heavy traffic, noise—and what many locals believe—contaminated water. Did the state do enough to help?

This is part one of a two-part investigative piece by H2O Radio.

H2o_logo_240_small Gas drilling came to southern Colorado's Raton Basin in the late 1990s, and along with it heavy traffic, noise—and what many locals believe—contaminated water caused by industry. Specifically numerous residents discovered they had a chemical in their water called “tert-Butyl alcohol” or "TBA." The state investigated the matter and published a report suggesting TBA was naturally occurring among other explanations. Now the case is closed and the report not only leaves more questions than it answers—it resigns residents to living with water they feel they dare not drink.

This is part one of a two-part investigative piece by H2O Radio. 

What Do Latinos Really Care About? Mi Tierra

From H2O Radio | Part of the Sounds From a Warming Planet series | 07:41

It’s election season and the news is full of headlines about the issues most on the minds of voters. And for candidates trying to woo Latino voters, there’s nothing more important than immigration, right? Wrong.

Poll after poll shows Latinos are more concerned about the effects of climate change than voters overall and that reducing smog and air pollution, conserving water, and protecting waterways and clean drinking water scored higher than immigration reform. Politicians would do well to pay attention—or pay the consequences.

H2oradio_logo_300_small It’s election season and the news is full of headlines about the issues most on the minds of voters. And for candidates trying to woo Latino voters, there’s nothing more important than immigration, right? Wrong. Poll after poll shows Latinos are more concerned about the effects of climate change than voters overall and that reducing smog and air pollution, conserving water, and protecting waterways and clean drinking water scored higher than immigration reform. Politicians would do well to pay attention—or pay the consequences.

Walking the Plank to Climate Disaster

From H2O Radio | Part of the This Week in Water series | 06:33

An Interview with Dr. Tony Ingraffea of Cornell University who's known as the "godfather" of the anti-fracking movement—a strange title for a man who spent the first twenty-five years of his career as a consultant to the oil and gas industry.

H2o_logo_240_small

Well-known Cornell engineering professor, Tony Ingraffea, explained at a conference in Denver, Colorado, on October 3rd why natural gas is not a bridge to sustainability, but a gangplank to climate disaster. To that point, he gave a chilling prediction about global warming, if we don't get off fossil fuels in twenty years. 

And Now for a Different Kind of Climate Change Story...

From H2O Radio | Part of the Sounds From a Warming Planet series | 10:58

A true account of climate scientists who didn't know about global warming, but told its story. The Vaux family thought they were just out for a fun train ride. Ultimately their discovery would come to demonstrate how our world is changing—in stark black and white terms.

H2oradio_logo_300_small A true account of climate scientists who didn't know about global warming, but told its story. The Vaux family thought they were just out for a fun train ride. Ultimately their discovery would come to demonstrate how our world is changing—in stark black and white terms.

Want to Avert an Alien Invasion? Call on Man’s Best Friend

From H2O Radio | Part of the Journalism About Water series | 07:41

They're only about the size of your fingernail, but they're a scourge of mammoth proportions. Zebra and quagga mussels are tiny mollusks that have spread from their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in the 1980s to plague water bodies from coast to coast. The invasive mussels are disrupting ecosystems, depleting food sources for aquatic life and damaging infrastructure. At present, there is NO solution. Can they be stopped before they attack every lake and river in North America? If two black labs and a German Shepherd have anything to say about it—YES.

H2o_logo_240_small They're only about the size of your fingernail, but they're a scourge of mammoth proportions. Zebra and quagga mussels are tiny mollusks that have spread from their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in the 1980s to plague water bodies from coast to coast. The invasive mussels are disrupting ecosystems, depleting food sources for aquatic life and damaging infrastructure. At present, there is NO solution. Can they be stopped before they attack every lake and river in North America? If two black labs and a German Shepherd have anything to say about it—YES.

The Hidden Cost of Road Salts

From H2O Radio | Part of the Journalism About Water series | 06:53

Road salts put down in Winter are emerging in drinking water and Summer streamflows. Are we trading mobility for environmental degradation?

H2o_logo_240_small Road salts keep drivers safe in snowy and icy conditions. Chemicals like Sodium Chloride (Rock Salt) or Magnesium Chloride work by lowering the temperature at which water can freeze. But come Spring as snow melts, chlorides are making their way into steams and groundwater around the country where they stay. Removing them is difficult and costly. Are we trading mobility for environmental degradation?  

An Interview with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

From H2O Radio | Part of the This Week in Water series | 06:41

Democracy and a Sustainable Environment: Indivisible

H2o_logo_240_small A conversation with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. about democracy and a sustainable environment. Kennedy, a longtime environmental attorney and now president of Waterkeeper Alliance says that government's role is to safeguard the public commons, "the air, the water, the wildlife, the fisheries, the public lands, the aquifers, the beaches, the shorelines, the rivers, those assets that cannot be reduced to private property ownership, but by their nature are owned by the whole community." 

Acequias: Wisdom in the Ditches

From H2O Radio | Part of the Journalism About Water series | 08:54

Acequias are communal irrigation canals that used to be found in much of the southwest. Only about 900 remain today, mostly in Northern New Mexico and the San Luis Valley of Colorado. If they disappear, we don't just lose ditches, we ignore wisdom that could help us survive drought and climate change.

H2o_logo_240_small Acequias are communal irrigation canals that used to be found in much of the southwest. Only about 900 remain today, mostly in Northern New Mexico and the San Luis Valley of Colorado. If they disappear, we don't just lose ditches, we ignore wisdom that could help us survive drought and climate change.

Snow Job— Following the Men and Women Who Measure Snowpack

From H2O Radio | Part of the Journalism About Water series | 10:24

We tagged along with some of the quiet heroes who, quite literally, go to great lengths to understand just how much water will come out of your tap.

H2o_logo_240_small We tagged along with some of the quiet heroes who, quite literally, go to great lengths to understand just how much water will come out of your tap.