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Playlist: John L Myers's Portfolio

 Credit: WHYY
Image by: WHYY 
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John L Myers

Karen Warrington

From Mighty Writers | Part of the "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio" Companion Pieces series | 06:41

Karen Warrington, director of communication for Congressman Robert Brady, has been an independent voice for Black political and social empowerment as the host and producer of popular radio, television and video programs. Here she recalls her days as a young listener of WDAS and later, a reporter at the station.

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This is one of the short non-narrated pieces that are standalone companion pieces to the documentary special, "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio. " Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. A generation of Black disc jockeys across the nation rapped and rhymed on the radio and played the hippest records that you couldn't hear on mainstream radio. In Philadelphia, there were two Black radio stations at the far right end of the dial that had a sound you couldn't hear anywhere else: WDAS and WHAT.

Like with the documentary special, these sound-rich companion pieces explore the legacy of Black radio in Philadelphia — which is actually the story of Civil Rights, the story of Black music, and the story of how media has changed in the last century.

This installment features Karen Warrington, the director of communications for Congressman Robert Brady. Warrington has long been an independent voice for Black political and social empowerment as the host and producer of popular radio, television and video programs. Here, she recalls her days as young listener of WDAS and later, a reporter at the station.

Doug Henderson Jr.

From Mighty Writers | Part of the "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio" Companion Pieces series | 03:21

Jocko Henderson was one of the most imitated Black personality disc jockeys of all time. He's known as the godfather of rap, the “Ace from Outer Space.” A generation later, Jocko’s son, Doug Henderson, Jr., followed in his father’s footsteps, broadcasting in the ’70s at WDAS, the same station where his father worked his ew-papa-doo radio style for an adoring audience. Here, Doug Jr. reminisces about his dad’s glory days.

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This is one of the short non-narrated pieces that are standalone companion pieces to the documentary special, "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio ." Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. A generation of Black disc jockeys across the nation rapped and rhymed on the radio and played the hippest records that you couldn't hear on mainstream radio. In Philadelphia, there were two Black radio stations at the far right end of the dial that had a sound you couldn't hear anywhere else: WDAS and WHAT.

Like with the documentary special, these sound-rich companion pieces explore the legacy of Black radio in Philadelphia — which is actually the story of Civil Rights, the story of Black music, and the story of how media has changed in the last century.

This installment of the series features Doug Henderson Jr., the son of the late great Jocko Henderson, the godfather of rap, the “Ace from Outer Space.” Jocko was one of the most imitated Black personality disc jockeys of all time. A generation later, Jocko’s son, Doug Henderson, Jr., followed in his father’s footsteps, broadcasting in the ’70s at WDAS, the same station where his father worked his ew-papa-doo radio style for an adoring audience. Here, Doug Jr. reminisces about his dad’s glory days.

Louise Williams

From Mighty Writers | Part of the "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio" Companion Pieces series | 04:02

Louise Williams is known as the “Gospel Queen of Philadelphia.” For 49 years, she hosted “The Louise Bishop Program” at WDAS, one of the highest-rated programs at the station. Bishop was elected to serve in the state House of Representatives in 1988 and has been re-elected 13 times by her Philadelphia constituents. Here, Louise remembers her earliest days on radio.

Louise_williams_small This is one of the short non-narrated pieces that are standalone companion pieces to the documentary special, "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio ." Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. A generation of Black disc jockeys across the nation rapped and rhymed on the radio and played the hippest records that you couldn't hear on mainstream radio. In Philadelphia, there were two Black radio stations at the far right end of the dial that had a sound you couldn't hear anywhere else: WDAS and WHAT.

Like with the documentary special, these sound-rich companion pieces explore the legacy of Black radio in Philadelphia — which is actually the story of Civil Rights, the story of Black music, and the story of how media has changed in the last century.

This installment in the series features Louise Williams, who's known as the “Gospel Queen of Philadelphia." She began her broadcasting career at WHAT radio as the youngest voice in radio. Moving to WDAS, she hosted “The Louise Bishop Program” for 49 years, one of the highest-rated programs at the station. Bishop was elected to serve in the state House of Representatives in 1988 and has been re-elected 13 times by her Philadelphia constituents. Here, Louise remembers her earliest days on radio.

Digital Detox

From John L Myers | 05:55

Spending too much time on Facebook or compulsively checking your smartphone might seem innocuous. But, as more people find it difficult to put their devices down, the idea of getting some help in order to ditch the digital world, if only temporarily - is gaining traction. John Myers tells us about a growing trend known as digital detox.

Digitaldetoxanalogzone_small The medical community is starting to take internet addiction more seriously. The American Psychiatric Association plans to include “Internet Use Disorder” (that’s the official medical term) in the appendix of their manual of mental disorders, the DSM. And so, if technology is the new addiction, then digital detox is the new rehab. And yes, there are hotels that offer digital detox rooms and even tech-free public spaces. But for those that need a little more help unplugging, there are digital detox retreats. That’s where Brenda Campbell and her husband [Kord Campbell] ended up. They found a retreat in Northern California.

We'll hear the Campbell's story and talk to the creators of the digital detox retreat they attended.  And we'll hear from the manager of a hotel in Pittsburgh who created a digital detox special.  Also Psychologist Kelly McGonigal tells us why smartphones are so addictive and what the consequences of their overuse might be.